Solo travel in Vietnam: 5 reasons to go it alone

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Seasoned traveller, Dylan has just returned from his second time travelling solo in Vietnam. He’s more convinced than ever that everyone should give it a go, at least once.

Notre Dame Vietnam, Solo travel in Vietnam

Both times I travelled through Indochina I decided to go it alone. When I first disappeared off to Vietnam, it was as a backpacker. As you can imagine, everything was on a bit of a budget, and occasionally hastily planned… You live and learn!

The second time I went, I had done a bit more planning, and with pick-ups and transfer arrangements organised I was actually able to relax. Who knew?

As flights become more frequent, tours become more interesting and travel blogs are packed with even more inspiration, it feels as though the world is getting smaller. With that, solo travel in Vietnam (with a plan in mind) has never been more accessible.

I understand that it can seem overwhelming, but the rewards are so worth it. Here are five of the reasons that solo travel in Vietnam is definitely for me (and probably you).

1. The adventure!

Travelling alone is a real adventure, and it makes you self-reliant. Whether it’s a spontaneous moment, or a result of meticulous planning, every accomplishment and amazing memory you take home is down to you, and you alone.

2. Meet new people

That’s not to say that solo travel in Vietnam is about being alone all day. Every day. Travelling alone will actually make you more friends in the long run. When you travel with someone you know, you’re bound to share amazing experiences, but you don’t really step outside of your comfort zone. Out there on your own, friendships (sometimes lifelong) have the opportunity to flourish. When I was in Laos, I joined a game of football with the locals – when I go back, we will definitely meet up again.

3. You can be selfish

This is YOUR holiday. Make the most of it! Travelling by yourself means that you can do whatever you want, whenever you want (without feeling bad). You want to read a book on the beach for two days straight? Do it! Try out that insect restaurant you heard about in Cambodia? Sure! Move into a draughty hut on the top of a mountain for two weeks? Why not!

4. Indochina is really safe (and easy)

In Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos the people are friendly, the food is incredible, and there are wonderful places to stay. Plan ahead and meet up with an English-speaking guide to find your feet and learn about the local area. Solo travel doesn’t mean planning everything alone either. If there are things you’re unsure about, find a reputable company that knows the area and can help it all go smoothly. I recommend a little company called InsideAsia Tours…

5. Make those big decisions

Away from home with nothing but the open road/runway/vast sea ahead of you, it’s time to clear your head and mull over those big life decisions you’ve been putting off, all distraction-free.


We’ve designed lots of solo traveller itineraries – pack up those big life decisions and let’s get planning.

If you’re thinking of going solo as part of a small group tour, be sure to book soon; we’re waiving our solo supplement for the whole of November, find out more here.

Dylan at a Chinese temple - Solo travel in Vietnam

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