Inside Burma Tours
Try your hand at lacquerware

Try your hand at lacquerware

Traditional lacquerware is one of Bagan's finest artisan products. Learn how it's made with the experts and have a go yourself!

Try your hand at one of Burma's traditional art forms at Bagan's oldest lacquerware shop. You'll be shown to the workshop where every phase of production, from splitting the bamboo to etching designs, is performed. Each stage will be described in detail to give you an understanding of how this ancient craft has developed into an art form in Bagan.
At the beginning of the process, the craftsman forms the piece from bamboo, which will then be painted with lacquer - a type of varnish made from thit-si, a sap harvested from the Melanorrhoea Usitata tree. Between eight and 16 layers of lacquer will be applied depending on the quality desired - a high-end piece of lacquerware can take a year to complete. After drying, the surface is polished. The last stage is where things get creative, and this is when it's your turn to take part.

One of the workshop's craftsmen will sketch a traditional design on a coaster.  You will then be provided with paint and a brush to complete your very own masterpiece. Afterwards, your work will be set aside to dry, and collected later in the day or the following morning.

When to go:

Try your hand at lacquerware

located in Bagan

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